Sunday, July 12, 2015

Thanks for another great year!

Another year has come and gone! Thanks to all of our amazing authors and illustrators who came out to this year's Books in Boothbay! And thanks, too, to all of the wonderful people who came out to meet them and pick up copies of their books. We hope you all had a great a time as we did.

The event may be over, but memories live on: You can see some great photos from this year's event on our Facebook page.

See you again next year!

Saturday, July 11, 2015

Today's the Day!

This is it! Books in Boothbay is going on TODAY at Boothbay Railway Village in Boothbay, Maine. Authors and illustrators of books for kids will be on hand in the morning, while adults can build up their own libraries during the afternoon. And remember -- admission is free! Come on down, we can't wait to see you!

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Our complete list of authors!

Books in Boothbay is just a few days away! Come meet all of our attending authors this Saturday, July 11. Children's authors and illustrators will be signing in the morning, while authors for adults will be on hand during the afternoon. We look forward to seeing you!

Betsey Anderson

Cady Elizabeth Arnold

Emerson W. Baker

Ben Bishop

Cheryl Blaydon

Jen Blood

P.D. Callahan

Joy Cameron

Ellen Cooney

Russ Cox

Jessie Crockett

Brian Daniels

Ronna Lambiasi DeLoe

Don Denico

Paul Doiron

Kaitlyn Dunnett

Kathy Lynn Emerson

Cathryn Falwell

Peter Felsenthal

Melissa Falcon Field

Kathie Fiveash

Kate Flora

Sarah Gagnon

Medea Harris

Fran Hodgkins

Jayne Rowe Jones

Brian Kevin

Liza Kleinman

Pat Lammers

Mary Lawrence

Teri Lee

Christopher Lockwood

Glenda MacLachlan

Francine McEwen

Wesley McNair

Kathryn Miles

Christopher Morin

Eva Murray

Hilary Nangle

Jim Nichols

Jane Parker

Cathie Pelletier

Paige Pendleton

Helen Peppe

Jay Piscopo

Lynn Plourde

Steven Powell

Gary Rainford

Mark Scott Ricketts

Bill Roorbach

Connie Saindon

Frank O Smith

Julia Spencer-Fleming

Brenda Reeves Sturgis

John Swan

Diane Taylor-Moore

JoJo Thoreau

Jacqueline Tourville

Wendy Ulmer

Susan Vaughan

Lea Wait

Russell Warnberg

Barbara T. Winslow

Jennifer Wixson

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Don Denico

Don Denico -- author of Can a Frog Fly? and other books -- grew up in Vassalboro, Maine and graduated from Winslow High School and the University of Southern Maine for both his undergraduate and graduate degrees. He is married to his wife, Bonny and they have two wonderful children. They reside in Standish, Maine where Don teaches at Bonny Eagle High School. Outside of his formal education he has passed the Maine Guides test, has taught drivers' education, and has achieved the rank of Black belt in Shaolin Kempo style Karate. He loves the challenge of building anything. His latest building project was a rib and plank Grand Laker Canoe. The Wood Chuck Valley Tales are stories he has created for his kids on the way to his family's camp in the deep woods of Maine. These stories were to keep them interested in the woods around them, off of electronic devices, and hopefully teach them some life lessons along the way.

Monday, July 6, 2015

Christopher W. Morin

Christopher W. Morin, author of A Tale of Life & War, was born, raised, and currently resides in Portland, Maine. He received a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Maine at Orono. He is a history enthusiast and has enjoyed creative writing since penning his first short story back in second grade.

Come meet Christopher W. Morin and all of our other authors at Books in Boothbay, this Saturday, July 11!

Brian Kevin

Brian Kevin is the author of The Footloose American: Following the Hunter S. Thompson Trail Across South America

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

I live just up the road, in Damariscotta. I've lived in Maine for about 5 years now, since my wife (who grew up in Cape Elizabeth) found me in Montana and convinced me to give the East a try. I'm also an editor at Down East magazine, so a lot of my writing life lately is Maine-centric.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?


The psychographic diversity of this state appeals to me quite a bit, the way you can spend a weekend hanging around Portland, another visiting Rangeley, another on the midcoast, another passing through Washington County, and another exploring the County, and feel like you've drifted through five pretty distinct micro-cultures.

What are the most important themes in your work?

I'm a pretty loud and proud generalist -- I try to cover as diverse a slate of topics in a given year as I possibly can, and I try to keep the formal approach fresh. That being said, I think a lot of the stories I'm most drawn to have something to do with displacement and/or slippery definitions of wildness.

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?


I'll be signing copies of The Footloose American: Following the Hunter S. Thompson Trail Across South America, a travel book published last year, which finds me retracing the route that a young Hunter S. Thompson traveled as a freelance foreign correspondent in the early 1960s, long before he came to fame as a self-proclaimed "gonzo journalist." It's a road narrative that explores culture, politics, and ecology in 21st century South America, with Thompson's ghost as a traveling companion and guide.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?


I think the book raises a questions about what it means to be an American abroad, about how immersion in a foreign culture changes a person and how it doesn't, and about how travelers leave their mark on the places they pass through. I hope readers come away from the book with a punch of potential answers to these questions they hadn't otherwise considered.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

I haven't given it a lot of thought, but I know I'm fond of my own local library, Skidompha Public Library, here in Damariscotta. I imagine the big challenge before libraries is how to remain relevant in an increasingly digital age — not just because of ebooks, but because of the many digital commons available to us that fill some of the roles libraries once filled. I do hope that bigger institutions especially manage to keep a focus on being research repositories, rather than shifting their emphases to say, DVD lending or internet access in the name of attracting the most patrons.

Come meet Brian Kevin and other Maine authors this Saturday at Books in Boothbay!

Pat Lammers

Pat Lammers served as a Peace Corps Volunteer from 1973-1976 in the Kingdom of Tonga, South Pacific. She introduced an English reading program to about 100 teachers. She was later a Park Ranger at Antietam National Battlefield, giving CW talks, firing a black powder rifle and a 12 pound cannon. She recently retired from the Portland Public School System where she taught fourth graders how to research topics and infiltrate facts into poetry. Pat currently lives in Bowdoin, Maine, spending her time observing nature, gardening, and of course - writing poetry.

Come meet Pat Lammers at Books in Boothbay this Saturday, July 11!

Sunday, July 5, 2015

John Swan

John Swan has had an extensive career as as a fine artist. His work is admired and collected world wide, and represents his many interests , travels and adventures.

A native of Maine, he divides his time between his studio home in Portland, his summer home in Rangeley, and the Bahamas where he spends a large part of every winter chasing bonefish and painting his brilliantly colored tropical watercolors.

"Pancakes and Fireflies" is his first children's book, which he has both written and illustrated. Inspired by John's grandson James, it is a story of a young boy who in the company of his father and grandfather experiences a special day of wonder and exploration in the great outdoors.

For more info on John Swan, visit www.johnswanfineart.com

Come meet John Swan and many more Maine authors at Books in Boothbay -- this Saturday, July 11!

Eva Murray

Eva Murray moved to Matinicus Island in 1987 expecting to serve for one year as the island's kindergarten-to-8th grade one-room school teacher. Instead of moving on afterward, she married and has been a full-time and year-round island resident for the past 28 years. Eva and her husband Paul, the island electrician, raised their two children on Matinicus (both have now graduated from college).

For roughly 15 years Eva has been a regular columnist for a number of Maine newspapers and magazines. Her first book, Well Out to Sea—Year-round on Matinicus Island, is a collection of essays describing the details of offshore life. Some of the short pieces are touching, many are irreverent, and all provide insight into “how things really work” on a remote Maine island.

Eva’s second book, Island Schoolhouse—One room for all takes the reader inside Maine’s remaining public one-room elementary schools, introducing teachers, students and communities for whom one-room school is an ordinary, 21st-century reality.

In Island Birthday, Eva’s first book for children, readers sense the exasperation all islanders feel when bad weather interferes with transportation, as it so often does! Riley, a boy of about eight, waits a bit impatiently for his birthday presents which must be delivered by airplane across the water. As he visits with his hardworking neighbors—a lobster boat crew, a working artist, the postal clerk, the telephone man, etc.-- he sees that everybody is waiting for something, and the inconveniences of island life are made up for by close friendships and a supportive community.

In addition to working as a freelance writer Eva Murray is an emergency medical technician, wilderness first responder, CPR instructor and SAR volunteer; she runs Matinicus Island’s solid waste and recycling program; she operates an island bakery each summer, and she is finishing work on a graduate certificate in Gifted and Talented Education. She is also a student pilot.

Come meet Eva Murray and many other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Liza Kleinman

Liza Kleinman is a freelance writer who lives in Portland, Maine. Her fiction has appeared in several magazines, including Crossborder, Hayden's Ferry Review, and Portland Magazine, as well as in the anthology Writes of Passage: Coming of Age Stories and Memoirs from the Hudson Review. Her first novel, Azalea, Unschooled, was published by Islandport Press in May 2015.

Wendy Ulmer

Wendy Ulmer, author of My Twelve Maine Christmas Days, is a former public school music and English teacher with 21years experience. Prior to teaching, she was a Registered Music Therapist, working in both clinical and public school settings.

Come meet Wendy Ulmer at Books in Boothbay!

Friday, July 3, 2015

Glenda MacLauchlan

Glenda MacLauchlan's There Is Life After Martinis tells a poignant story of a woman’s journey from the crippling shackles of alcoholism to a joyful life of sobriety.

Like many others, Glenda was raised in a chaotic home. The damage done in childhood led to a life of tension, fear and learned unhealthy behaviors. Encouraged by mom and dad, she started drinking in her teens. She recounts a story of spiralling down the same path as her parents. For way too long, she insisted life as “party girl” was what she wanted, right up until her arrest for drunken driving.

Glenda shares colorful, sometimes humorous stories of life in her 20’s living in Hawaii. Her love of music, especially Elvis Presley’s, provided refuge in childhood and remains a constant today.

Come meet Glenda MacLauchlan and other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Connie Saindon

Connie Saindon is the author of the Murder Survivor's Handbook.


What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?
I was born in Boothbay Harbor which is where my grandparents lived. Gramps worked at Sampson Ship Yard and was and painter. My mother bought a cottage in Ocean Point and I purchased it from her in 1991. Since then I have come  to Boothbay every summer. I winter in San Diego, CA where I developed my career as a mental health professional. 

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?
The subject I have been writing about it a tough one. Having the incredible beauty of Maine and its nearby ocean serves to counterbalance the difficult topic for me. My twice daily walks in Ocean Point and the friendliness of all I encounter in the Boothbay area make it possible for me to write and get sustenance too. 

What are the most important themes in your work?

The themes in this work is focused on providing self-help for those who want to understand lives or must live a life changed by a violent death. 

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?

Murder Survivors Handbook: Real-Life Stories, Tips and Resources. Unlike CSI, this book will give readers  a true accounting of what folks go through when someone they loved was murdered. The topics are selected to be of greatest concern to survivors of murder where ever they live across the country. Although not an encyclopedia nor a bible, this is truly a resource that has not been available before. 

The book is organized with ten topics that those who had a loved one murdered may need resources on. There are eleven survivors who answer questions pertaining to each of the ten chapter topic. All survivors were granted anonymity in order to not only protect them from further harm but also to allow them to be candid.  

There are an additional 20 contributors and reviewers from criminal justice, mental health and research that add helpful information. Each chapter ends with additional resources to take the inquiry of the topic further.  

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?

I hope they will be able to remove any judgment about people who lose someone to murder. My brother aged nine could no longer play with his friend because his sister was murdered. 

I hope readers the resilience of the survivor writers  amid such enormous wounds of their " life sentence."

I hope survivors and those who work with them will find paths to follow and questions answered by using this resource.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries? 

I see our libraries as a safe hub, rich in resources  where communities can connect and make a difference by strengthening and enriching our world. The local library can meld curiosity and divergent views  with resources and technology  at our fingertips amid meetings, trainings and discussions. 

Fran Hodgkins

Fran Hodgkins is the author of Secret Galaxy and other books.

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

We’ve lived here in Maine for about seven years now. We had come to the midcoast area several times to do book events for Down East when we lived in Massachusetts, and when the time came to return to New England after living briefly in Maryland, we decided that the midcoast area was the right place for us.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

I love the community of writers and illustrators here. I also love being able to sit at my kitchen table with the windows open and hear the small river that runs behind my house. Inspiring!

What are the most important themes in your work?

As a nonfiction writer, curiosity is always important, and in my nonfiction work about animals, such as Little Loon and Andre, I’m always interested in how humans affect the lives of the other creatures with whom we share the planet.

Tell us about the books you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year.

I’m not entirely sure what will be there, but here’s info on two of my latest. The Secret Galaxy came out from Tilbury House last October; it tells the story of the Milky Way galaxy in the galaxy’s own voice, including not just the science but also the cultural history of what people believed the galaxy to be when they saw it in the night sky.  In July Little Loon is due out from Down East; it’s the realistic story of a loon family.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?
In The Secret Galaxy, I hope that readers will be inspired to get outside and look up at the sky. Maine is a wonderful place to stargaze because we don’t have as much light pollution as many other locations do. For readers who do live in places where it’s hard to see the night sky, I wanted to show them what there is to look forward to!

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?
Libraries are the lifeblood of any community, and they, probably more than any other community institution, reflect the changes that society is experiencing, both culturally and technologically. Not everybody is pleased that libraries aren’t just for reading silently anymore, but they’ve changed. They offer technology access to those who cannot afford it on their own, and they’re the new “town square” – the place where people come together. I think that this role will continue to grow and that librarians will continue to be the best defense against Orwell’s Big Brother, ignorance, and intolerance. I guess you could say I’m a huge fan!

Come meet Fran Hodgkins and other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Julia Spencer-Fleming

A former military brat, New York Times and USA Today bestselling novelist Julia Spencer-Fleming grew up in places as diverse as Montgomery, Rome, Stuttgart and Syracuse. A graduate of Ithaca College, George Washington University and the University of Maine School of Law, she took up writing while still a stay-at-home mother of two. During the time it took to finish her first novel, she got a full-time job at a Portland, Maine, law firm and had a third child. Julia didn’t want to write yet another lawyer-sleuth, so she used her army past and a keen eye for the goings-on at her Episcopal church to create Clare Fergusson, first female priest in the small Adirondack town of Millers Kill. The resulting series has won or been nominated for every American mystery award available, including the Edgar, the Anthony, and the Agatha. Her most recent book is Through the Evil Days.

Now happily quit of the law, Julia lives in the Maine countryside with her husband, daughter, and occasionally, a couple of college students. Learn more about her at www.juliaspencerfleming.com.

Come meet Julia-Spencer-Fleming at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Francine McEwen

Francine McEwen is the author of Susan's Suitcase and other books.

What are your ties to Maine?

Born in Winthrop, MA (on the ocean). Father loved Maine and we went to Maine every year for our vacation (from one ocean to the other). I also went camping in Maine for many years at my sister’s campsite in Naples. Close friends of the family had a homestead in Harrison, Maine, where we spent many wonderful times. I had always wanted to live in Maine and was hired by Digital Equipment Corp. in Augusta. I happily relocated and have been here since 1977.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?


The people in Maine are so wonderful and the area is peaceful, much different from the hectic pace of living and working in Boston. The calm and beauty of Maine really supports writing.

What are the most important themes in your work?
All of my writing is focused on helping children, from bullying prevention to dealing with the grieving/loss process.
       
Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year.

I will be signing my new book, Susan’s Suitcase, and my bullying book, Billy Big
Ears and Bob the Bully
.

What do you hope reader will discover in your latest book?

Susan’s Suitcase is a true story to help parents talk with their children about the grieving process, I think they will discover that love never dies, and that there are supportive ways to get through difficult times.

What have you enjoyed about attending Books in Boothbay?

I was part of the Books in Boothbay event last year, and I thought it was a very important event to focus children on reading. I loved meeting and talking with the other Maine authors, and really enjoyed meeting parents and their children.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

Augusta’s Lithgow Library and the Winthrop Library are both expanding, so that’s a good sign. I believe that the events that take place at our libraries really help to get people to support those libraries. I attended an event at the Winthrop Library that featured Tess Gerritsen, and most libraries offer readings by local authors for children. As long as the libraries keep up with the technology and other media changes, I think we will be fine.

Come meet Francine McEwen and other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Hilary Nangle

Freelance journalist Hilary Nangle grew up on the Maine Coast, and despite out-of-state interludes for college, grad school, and a stint as a ski bum, she’s never been able to resist the lure of her home state. She indulges her sense of wanderlust by seeking out the offbeat and quirky, and rarely resisting the invitation of a back road, local farm stand, or lobster shack. She’s shared her finds in articles for national and regional publications, as well as on her MaineTravelMaven.com website and in her three Moon-series guidebooks: Moon Maine, Moon Coastal Maine, and Moon Acadia National Park. She’s also a National Geographic Expert for National Geographic Expeditions 2016 Maine excursions.

Come meet Hilary Nangle and other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Cady Elizabeth Arnold

Cady Elizabeth “Betsy” Arnold, author of the "Tapestry" series, is a Social Worker who believes in the healing power of narrative. In addition, she believes in the beauty of the world, and the meaning to be found in relationships. She has the great good fortune to have served as a counselor in an elementary school, at two colleges, and in various other settings where students have shared their stories with her while on the path to healing and wholeness. 

Currently, she spends her non-writing time enjoying her family, spending time with friends, kayaking, mountain biking, eating chocolate, and taking long walks in the New Hampshire woods with her dog, Oscar.

To learn more about Cady visit www.thetapestrybooks.com

Come meet Cady Elizabeth Arnold at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Kathie Fiveash

Kathie Fiveash is a lifelong naturalist and teacher who lives on Isle au Haut, an unbridged island in Penobscot Bay, Maine. Her book Island Naturalist is a compilation of columns she wrote about the ecology of the island for Stonington Maine’s local newspaper, Island Advantages.

Come meet Kathie Fiveash at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Russell Warnberg

Russell Warnberg -- writer, teacher, artist and woodworker -- grew up in Minnesota. After joining the Navy, has spent most of his life in Maine. Having earned a degree from the University of Minnesota and a Masters degree from the University of Maine he taught history and English in both public and private schools for many years. He has sold a few paintings and many pieces of furniture he designed and built.  Finally, he decided it was time to write that novel he always dreamed about. It is not the novel that he had ever thought he would write, however, it turned out to be a lot more fun than he had  anticipated. The first novel was Edge of Redemption, followed shortly by The Chalk Line Killer, and now The Gateway Murders. These are all crime dramas set in Maine because this is where he draws his inspiration.

Come meet Russell Warnberg and many other thrilling authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Kathryn Miles

Kathryn Miles is the author of three books, including Adventures with Ari, All Standing, and Superstorm: Nine Days Inside Hurricane Sandy.  An award-winning journalist, her writing has appeared in dozens of publications including Best American Essays, The Boston Globe, The New York Times, Outside, Popular Mechanics, and Time.  Miles currently serves as writer-in-residence for Green Mountain College and as a member of the low-residency faculty for the Chatham University MFA program. She and her family live in Portland, Maine.

Come meet Kathryn Miles and many other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Frank O. Smith

Frank O Smith was raised in the West, lived in the South, and has resided in Maine for nearly 30 years.

He is a writer, ghostwriter, and writing coach. He also teaches writing through the Maine College of Art (MECA) and the Maine Writers & Publishers Alliance (MWPA). He is a regular contributor to the Maine Sunday Telegram Book section.

His novel Dream Singer was a finalist for the Bellwether Prize, created by best-selling novelist Barbara Kingsolver, “in support of a literature of social change.” It was named in December 2014 as a Notable Book of the Year in Literary Fiction by “Shelf Unbound,” the international, indie book review magazine that has 125,000 readers in over 70 countries. Margaret Brown, the publisher, is a National Book Critics Circle Lifetime Member.

Come meet Frank O Smith at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Monday, June 29, 2015

Richard Loren

Richard Loren began his post collegiate career in the entertainment industry in 1965 as a theatre manager.

From 1965 to 1969 he worked as an Agent for the Agency for the Performing Arts in New York City. An exciting time music,  he signed and worked with many of new up-and-coming  artists and groups like The Doors and The Jefferson Airplane. 

In 1970, he took a break from the business and traveled and lived abroad. 

A year later he returned to New York where his friend mandolinist David Grisman introduced him to Jerry Garcia. Shortly thereafter, he moved to the San Francisco bay area where he was hired by Garcia as his personal manager.  He worked closely with the Saunders/Garcia Band and encouraged the formation of Old and In The Way.  He brought the group to the East coast where they played rock venues for Grateful Dead fans and Bluegrass festivals for Bluegrass fans.

In 1974, he was hired by the Grateful Dead as their Agent. A year later, he became their Manager.  He was the non-credited Executive Producer of the Grateful Dead Movie. In conjunction with the opening of the movie at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York, he initiated an industry first by distributing the film to theaters across the country in a four-wall format.

 In 1977, while on vacation in Egypt he conceived the idea of having the Grateful Dead perform an outdoor concert in front of the Sphinx and the Great Pyramid at Gizeh. One year later, after much in depth organizing, the band took the stage there on September 14, 15 and 16 and played three memorable concerts.  During the last show, on the eve of the historic Camp David Peace Agreement, the band played throughout a full lunar eclipse of the moon. Never before had a rock band, let alone a rock band from the West, played at that the site.

In 1980, to commemorate the band’s 15th anniversary, he broke tradition yet again by having the Grateful Dead play at The Radio City Music Hall in New York. At that venue, like in Egypt, the Grateful Dead was the first “rock” band in history to play that stage. He had the comedians AL Franken and Tom Davis of Saturday Night Live fame host the Halloween week - multi-night - acoustic/electric concerts. Later, he produced Dead Ahead, a compilation of the concert footage, originally released by Monterey Video on VHS and recently re-leased by them on DVD.

He resigned from the Dead and the music business in 1981. He now lives in New England and continues to be interviewed and quoted frequently by music industry authors and magazine writers.

In 2008 he Executive Produced Rocking the Cradle, the 30th anniversary 2CD/DVD of The Grateful Dead’s three performance at the pyramids of Giza.

Come meet Richard Loren and many other authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Medea Harris

Medea Harris is the author of the Ruby Fairy series.

What are your ties to Maine?

My mother grew up in Maine, and, beginning at age 3 months I spent my summers and most holidays in Maine.  Some of my fondest childhood memories are from the summers I spent in Andover and Boothbay with my family.  It was a tradition I was able to start with my own family some fifteen years ago until we were fortunate enough to move to Southport full time last year.

While the story of Ruby Fairy initially takes place in Orlando, Florida, our children have always thought she has a fairy house somewhere in Fairy Forrest on Squirrel Island.

What are the most important themes in your work?

The most important themes in the Ruby Fairy Stories are friendship, kindness, and knowing that it is okay to believe in a little magic at any age.

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year.

This year, I will be signing two books: Introducing Ruby Fairy: The Story of Ruby and Lilley, and Ruby Fairy and the Spider’s Web.

What do you hope reader will discover in your latest book?

I hope readers will just enjoy the story. I also hope that if you have a little girl in your family, she may be able to relate to Lilley and Ruby.

What have you enjoyed about attending Books in Boothbay?

We have attended Books in Boothbay in the past. We love that it is at the Railway Village. We especially love that our children have the opportunity to meet “actual” authors!

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

We feel that libraries are so important to communities. Call us old fashioned, but nothing beats holding a book in your hands, and the feeling of turning the pages of a book.  Libraries provide a valuable community meeting place and, MOST IMPORTANTLY,  books are available for FREE to EVERYONE!

Come meet Medea Harris at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Sunday, June 28, 2015

Paul Doiron

Paul Doiron is the author of the Mike Bowditch series of crime novels, including The Poacher's Son, which won the the Barry Award and the Strand Critics Award for Best First Novel and was nominated for an Edgar Award, an Anthony Award, a Macavity Award, and a Thriller Award for Best First Novel, and the Maine Literary Award for "Best Fiction of 2010." His latest novel is The Precipice.

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

I grew up in Scarborough and have lived most of my life in various places around Maine.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

My favorite things about writing in Maine are my favorite things about living in Maine: the rugged beauty, the living history, the independent-minded and big-hearted people.

What are the most important themes in your work?


My books tend to grapple with two issues: what does it mean to be a man in twenty-first century America and the dangers of our increasing alienation from the natural world.

Tell us about the books you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?

I’ll be signing The Precipice, which is the sixth book in my series of crime novels about Maine game warden Mike Bowditch. This one is set in the 100 Mile Wilderness section of the Appalachian Trail and concerns the mysterious disappearance of two female thru-hikers.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?

Since I write a series, I am hoping that readers who pick up The Precipice will want to go back to the previous novels to discover more about the eventful life of Mike Bowditch.

If you have attended Books In Boothbay in the past, please tell us what you enjoyed about it?

I enjoy catching up with other Maine authors — many of whom I haven’t seen in ages  — and being introduced to new ones. And of course, it’s always a thrill to meet readers.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

I see libraries evolving more and more into community centers and information hubs which is just the extension of what they have done all along. That said, it saddens me to see some libraries backing away from their historic role as the curators of physical books because books are more than the “content" inside their pages — they are four-dimensional artifacts, each with its own unique history.

Come meet Paul Doiron and many other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Mark Scott Ricketts

Mark Scott Ricketts is a Maine-based Arkansas-born writer/illustrator who has created many graphic novels, including an Invincible Iron Man story arc for Marvel. Ricketts has most recently published a humor title, A Flatlander’s Guide to Maine, and an award-winning children’s picture book, Adventures in Vacationland, with Islandport Press.

http://www.mscottricketts.com

What is your favorite thing about writing and illustrating in Maine?

When the weather is nice, and I need inspiration, all I have to do is crank up the car and drive fifteen minutes in any direction. In Maine, there’s a beautiful view around every corner. While I’m soakin’ up the atmosphere, something (or someone) wicked funny always sneaks up behind me. This place breeds characters. Stephen King, Marshall Dodge, and John Gould have introduced us to a few. And the creatures around here can be a little peculiar. The moose is majestic, but, boy, is it weird. The lobster — what can I say — it looks dang near prehistoric. Tasty, but strange nonetheless. The charm and beauty of the landscape, the oddball fauna, along with the humor and honesty of the people keeps me grounded; encourages creativity. Winter in Maine can be wondrous, too. Plus, the bitter cold is a pretty good excuse to snuggle up with your keyboard and get down to work. You can’t get cabin fever when you’re building new worlds inside your head. Sure, those times when you have to shovel snow can be a pain. But I tend to come up with some of my best ideas while digging out my driveway.

Come have a Maine adventure -- Meet Mark Scott Ricketts at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Peter Felsenthal

Photographer and author Peter Felsenthal has been taking pictures since the days of Kodak box cameras. Since moving to Maine he has had the ability to spend full time pursuing his new career. Originally trained in physics he has always written and photographed as an avocation. Pursuing photography with the aid of some professional training has led to a passion for story telling and writing about subjects he cares deeply about. His interest in organic farming and green approaches to modern life have coincided with the ability to use the traditional media, a book, as a means of communicating the passion and hard work that goes into a present day organic farm.

The book -- New Growth: Portraits of Six Maine Organic Farms -- has been awarded first place for the best Gift Book of the year by the Independent Book Publishers Association and has been nominated a finalist in the  CoffeeTableBook/Photography category and a finalist in the regional non Fiction category by the Next Generation Book awards organization. Peter has also authored a book of poetry published by Blackberry Press.

Come meet Peter Felsenthal at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Mary Lawrence

Mary Lawrence studied biology and chemistry, graduating from Indiana University with a degree in Cytotechnology. After working for years as a cytologist, she now farms and writes in Limington. The Alchemist's Daughter is the first book in the Bianca Goddard Mysteries. You can visit her at www.marylawrencebooks.com

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

I’ve lived in Maine for over 30 years, having moved to Portland from Indiana to work as a cytotechnologist at Mercy Hospital. Except for a brief detour to Western Massachusetts, I’ve called Maine home.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

The long winters are perfect for reading and contemplation. I get a lot of writing done in the winter.

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?


The Alchemist’s Daughter is my debut mystery in the Bianca Goddard Mysteries published by Kensington. The series takes place in Tudor London near the end of King Henry VIII’s reign and features the daughter of an infamous alchemist and a provocative cast of commoners. This is my first published novel.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?

The Alchemist’s Daughter is an edgy historical mystery.  It’s got a smattering of romance and a little bit of creep factor.  I hope to immerse readers in the dangerous world of 1543 Tudor London and take them on a fast-paced murder adventure they won’t forget.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

I think libraries are going to play a more important role in connecting readers to new writers. I see librarians taking on a more advisory role with brick and mortar stores thinning ranks. Someone has to help advocate for readers and writers and they’ll come to be some of the few human voices that will still be heard in this increasingly more digital world.  So many readers make their choices by looking at what books are being pushed on them by media and big publishing houses. Folks forget there are a lot of excellent writers and books out there that don’t have a big PR budget behind them.  Librarians  are on the forefront of finding out what is new and what is worth reading.

Come meet Mary Lawrence and many other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Friday, June 26, 2015

Betsey Anderson

Maine native Betsey Anderson is the author of Maggie Goes to Maine.

Christopher G. Lockwood

Christopher G. Lockwood is the author of The Tennis Ball Trees, a children’s book published in 2013 through Maine Authors Publishing. It’s a whimsical story with a surprise ending about a Labrador Retriever’s love of tennis balls. The target audience is preschoolers through 3rd or 4th graders, but adults also enjoy the story and the wonderful illustrations by Kathleen Fox, a watercolor artist who lives in Tenants Harbor, Maine.  (www.tennisballtrees.com)

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Kate Flora

Award-winning mystery and true crime writer Kate Flora is the author of 14 books, including the Agatha and Anthony nominated true crime story Death Dealer and the novel And Grant You Peace which is a 2015 Maine Literary Award finalist. Her book Finding Amy (true crime), co-written with a Portland, Maine deputy police chief, was a 2007 Edgar Award nominee. Kate’s other titles include the Thea Kozak mysteries and the starred-review Joe Burgess police series, the third of which, Redemption, won the 2013 Maine Literary Award for Crime Fiction.

A former assistant attorney general in the areas of battered children and employment discrimination, Kate is a founding member the New England Crime Bake and Maine Crime Wave conferences, a founder of Level Best Books where she worked as an editor and publisher for seven years. She has served as international president of Sisters in Crime. When she’s not riding an ATV through the Canadian woods or hiding in a tick-infested field waiting to be found by search and rescue dogs as research for her books, she can be found teaching writing at Grub Street in Boston.

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

Ties to Maine: Born in Maine, went to school in Maine, worked for the Maine Attorney General after law school, and spend 5-6 months a year in Harpswell

Ties to Boothbay? My brother John Clark was, for several years, librarian in Boothbay Harbor, and my niece worked for the Boothbay Register. Part of my first Joe Burgess mystery, Playing God, takes place on the Boothbay penninsula

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?


Things, I’d say. First, Maine is so full  of characters that a write can just sit back and collect them. Second, Maine is great for solitary work because we have such a strong tradition of minding our business and leaving people alone. Third, I find endless inspiration in the landscape, the weather, and the wildlife.

What are the most important themes in your work?

Poverty, and the contrasts between haves and have nots; the edgy way we feel about people from away. The way that necessity and fear can drive people to crime. And because of my legal background, I am always fascinated by good and evil, and what makes people decide they’re not bound by the social contract to do no harm.

Tell us about the books you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?

My two new books are a true crime involving Canadian police and the Maine Warden Service, called Death Dealer: How Cops and Cadaver Dogs Brought a Killer to Justice and my fourth Joe Burgess police procedural, And Grant You Peace, is about the challenges of investigating a murder in Portland’s immigrant community.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?


Both books can be called “police procedurals” though one is real and one is fiction. I try to take readers inside the police officer’s lives to show their process, their dedication, and how hard they try to get justice for victims.

If you have attended Books In Boothbay in the past, please tell us what you enjoyed about it?

There are so many things I like about Books in Boothbay. It’s such a great opportunity for Maine writers to get to know each other and spend time with each other. I also love seeing the organizers every year, and how generous they are to us. It’s a very special event for Maine writers.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?


Gosh…as the sister of a librarian and the daughter of a library trustee, and someone whose first job, at 11 ½, was as the local librarian’s assistant and now spends her life in libraries…I just have to hope libraries, which in Maine are such a vital resource, will survive.

Recently, I heard someone on NPR pontificating on the question: In the age of Google and Amazon, do we still need libraries? Obviously, this man had never been in a small town library and see the many, many ways they serve the community. Not only in providing books, audio disks, music, and movies, but in providing internet access, access to job applications and tax forms, assistance in dealing with those forms, and providing a place for teens, tweens, young moms, and others to get together. I fear that many people don’t realize how much a library does for the community or how far their limited funding has to stretch.

Come meet Kate Flora and many other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Lea Wait

Edgecomb author, historian, and antique print dealer Lea Wait’s latest book is TWISTED THREADS, the first in her Mainely Needlepoint series Maine, with a background of custom and antique embroidery… set in a Maine town not unlike Boothbay Harbor.

What are your ties to Maine?

I’ve been vacationing in the Boothbay/Edgecomb area since I was six years old. In 1955 my parents and grandparents went together to buy the home I now live in. It was built on Westport Island in 1774, and was moved to Edgecomb in 1832. I’ve been lucky enough to live there full time since 1998.  I’ve had 13 books published so far (15 by the end of this year and one next January,) and only four are set outside of Maine. I love the people here, the geography ... and I love that our state’s history is so close at hand.

What are the most important themes in your work?

I write two mystery series (the Shadows Antique print mystery series and the Mainely Needlepoint series) and historical novels set in 19th century Wiscasset. They have in common a love of Maine and its history, and of the way ordinary people have lived here in both the past and the present. The importance of family, and of the roles of women and children, can be found in all my work.

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year.

My most recent book is TWISTED THREADS, the first in my Mainely Needlepoint series. Angie Curtis grew up in Haven Harbor, the daughter of a single parent with an unfortunate reputation. Her mother disappeared when Angie was ten, and her grandmother brought her up. After high school Angie headed west,  and spent ten years working for a private investigator in Arizona. But now her mother’s body has been found, and she’s back in Maine, determined to find out why her mother left .. and how she died.

She also finds out that her grandmother’s custom needlepoint business has been cheated by its agent, and she finds herself solving a second murder .. perhaps one connected to her mother’s death.

What have you enjoyed about attending Books in Boothbay?

I’ve been at almost all the Books in Boothbay events, and love them. What a wonderful setting, and opportunity for authors and readers to meet each other, talk books ... and for people to add signed books to their collections or gift lists. (I also love talking to other authors, since most of us spend our lived in our studies, starring at screens.)

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

Where would I be without them? They’ve been a part of my life since I was a pre-schooler, and they’re now the source of much of the research I do for my books. Plus, of course, I love that books I’ve written are now on the shelves. Many books are expensive today, so, although as  writer I depend on people (and libraries!) buying my books, I also love that those for whom buying books is an impossibility still have access to them, through their local libraries, like those in Boothbay Harbor, Wiscasset, and Damariscotta – three wonderful local libraries.

Come meet Lea Wait and many, many other local authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Lynn Plourde

Lynn Plourde is the author of twenty-nine children’s books including Pigs in the Mud in the Middle of the Rud, Wild Child, Dino Pets You’re Wearing THAT to School?! and her newest, Merry Moosey Christmas. Her books have received a variety of recognitions including Junior Library Guild selection, School Library Journal Best Book of the Year, Los Angeles Times Best Children’s Book, Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Gold Award, and Amelia Bloomer List. Plourde considers herself a “teaching author,” as she does numerous author visits to schools each year during which she teaches students how to write their own stories. Video read-alouds, learning activities, and a blog on teaching writing are available on her www.lynnplourde.com website. Plourde is a Maine

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Jen Blood

Born and raised in Midcoast Maine, Jen Blood wrote (actually, dictated) her first story when she was three years old. It involved a little girl with blue eyes, blonde hair, and a tuna fish sandwich; since that time, she has continued to focus on character-driven fiction, though the plots have become slightly more complex over the years. Jen is author of the bestselling, Maine-based Erin Solomon mysteries, and the soon-to-be-released romantic thriller Midnight Lullaby. Jen currently lives in the Midcoast once more, where she runs an editing business, paddles the nearby pond, hangs out with her mystical pup Killian, and – of course – is forever busy scribbling the next mystery.

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

I grew up in Midcoast Maine, living in the same crooked house on Beechwood Street in Thomaston from three till eighteen, and for brief stints for years thereafter. I lived in Portland for several years, traveled a little, and ultimately landed back in the Midcoast region a few years ago, where I live currently.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

The things that drove me crazy when I was a kid growing up in Maine are many of the things that I love about the state today. The Midcoast is a tight-knit community filled with a great mix of dodgy codgers and offbeat younger folk, all of whom march to their own drummers. They’re unique, kind, and fiercely loyal, and I love integrating those characters into my work, at the same time shining a light on local businesses that deserve a second look.

What are the most important themes in your work?

Themes… hmm. Friendship and loyalty are very big in my books. Love, naturally. Finding your own truth regardless of the cost, and being brave enough to confront that truth and keep moving. There are also explosions and fires and crafty bad guys, though, so don’t let all this lofty talk fool you.

Tell us about the books you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?

This past winter, I completed the five-book Erin Solomon pentalogy, so I’ll have all five novels available to sign at that time. The series follows reporter Erin Solomon as she returns to her hometown of Littlehope, Maine, to investigate an alleged cult suicide she witnessed as a child. Over the course of the five novels, Erin delves more deeply into the mystery when she learns that her own father played a central role in the tragedy. The books take readers from the heart of Midcoast Maine to the backwoods of Western Kentucky; from the wilds of the Allagash all the way down to the ancient temples of the Yucatan Peninsula. There’s love, loss, serpentine twists, well-drawn characters, and an epic love story. And a dog. Don’t forget the dog.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?


I hope they’ll come to appreciate the journey Erin has been on through the course of the five novels, while simultaneously discovering the truth behind all the mysteries she’s been delving into. I’ve very much enjoyed exploring the arcs for all of my characters since the first novel came out in 2012, but particularly love the evolution of the relationship between Erin and her mother, and the two love interests who have developed and matured in the series.

If you have attended Books In Boothbay in the past, please tell us what you enjoyed about it?

I love Books in Boothbay! It’s such a great opportunity to mix with other Maine authors, booksellers, book lovers, and – of course – readers! It’s a nice, friendly vibe in a beautiful place, and is honestly one of the things I’ve come to look forward to most about July in Maine.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

It’s certainly not an easy time to be a library these days, with ebooks and Amazon and all those things that make it so simple for readers to just stay locked behind closed doors rather than venturing into the wide world. But, I also think it’s an exciting time, and I love reading about the new ways that libraries are opening themselves up to Mainers with outreach programs, readings, and community events. They remain a great source of inspiration for me and most of the book lovers I know, and I hope those individuals who value the written word will continue to do everything possible to make libraries a vibrant, relevant part of our communities.

Come meet Jen Blood and a more authors than you can count at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Brenda Sturgis

Brenda Sturgis is a native Maine writer who lives on a lovely little lake, where she listens to loons hoot, watches moose meander, and occasionally sees silly turkeys performing a circus in the road. She is married to her husband Gary, and is the mother of 4 children, and the grandmother of 7 grandchildren. She loves writing for children, reading to children, and she even enjoys reading to adults as well. You can learn more about her at www.brendareevessturgis.com

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

I was born in Westbrook Maine, and have been a resident all of my life. I love all things Maine, the four seasons, the beautiful landscape. I live on a lovely little lake in Maine, and love to listen to the Loons hoot back and forth across the lake.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

I love being a Maine writer, there is so much inspiration that surrounds us here. Whether I am writing about Turkeys in the Road, or the Lake Where Loon Lives, there are always situations that spark moments of imagination that I can turn into stories for children.

What are the most important themes in your work?

It seems my themes revolve around nature, animals in their natural habitat that are turned into quirky stories with fun and lively illustrations.

Tell us about the books you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?


I will be signing 10 Turkeys in the Road, illustrated by David Slonim, published by Marshall Cavendish, Two Lions, and Scholastic, and The Lake Where Loon Lives, published by Islandport Press, illustrated by Brooke Carlton.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?

I hope readers will discover a fun and evocative book with plenty of wordplay, and beautiful language along with colorful and fanciful illustrations, and of course, I hope they will discover the wonderful blurb on the back cover by one of my all time favorite authors, Chris Van Dusen.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

Our libraries are important to our children, and to our future children. A library is a place like non other, a place where children can feel the cover of books and immerse themselves in other worlds with like-minded people. Our libraries are not just places to learn, but to build friendships, ignite imaginations, and create dreamers, who then become the writers and illustrators of tomorrow. 

Come meet Brenda Sturgis and dozens of additional writers and artists at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Monday, June 22, 2015

Teri Lee

Teri Lee is the author of Troubled Spirits, a YA paranormal novel.

What are your ties to Maine?

I was born in Maine and spent most of my life here. I love to gaze up into the clear night sky. It's just not the same anyplace else. And there's nothing like breathing in the ocean air, listening to the sounds of the waves crashing and the gulls calling to each other. No matter where I travel to, a piece of me always remains in Maine.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

I think what I like best is the freshness of our state. It keeps my mind clear and everyplace I look I find inspiration. Beyond that, the Maine way of life is unique, it's a different pace. Mainers are hard working, strong minded, steady as you go people. The type of characters that can carry a story and some time even take it over.  important themes in your work?

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?

Troubled Spirits is a YA paranormal novel. After the sudden death of her father, sixteen-year old Annie and her mother move to a fictional town just off the coast of Maine. Annie doesn't believe in ghosts. To her the supernatural is nothing more than a figment of her mother's over-active imagination. So when her friends coax her into joining them on a ghost hunting expedition, she is convinced they will discover nothing more than disappointment. Instead she discovers that ghosts are real. And some ghosts do not wish to be disturbed.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?


My favorite part of reading (and writing) is getting lost in the story. This is what I hope for those who read my book.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

Libraries are an essential part of our community and therefore must be protected, preserved, grown. There is magic beyond the doors of a library. Magic that can't be found anyplace else.

Come meet Teri Lee and other spooky authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Gary Rainford

Gary Rainford is a Maine-Island-Poet. Gary lives on Swan's Island year-round with his wife and daughter. His poetry, shaped by tides and saltwater, is published in a wide range of literary magazines and university journals, including North Dakota Quarterly, Words and Images, Aurorean, Omphalos, and Kindred.

Salty Liquor, Gary's first book of poems, was published by North Country Press. www.garyrainford.com

What are your ties to Maine?

My wife, Mimi, is from New Hampshire, but spent summers with her grandmother in Boothbay. Mimi loves the coast of Maine, and in the late 1990s we set out to find the right place to plant roots, work, and raise a family. In 2001 we moved to Swan's Island.  Our daughter, Meri, whose name in Finish means “of the sea” is an islander, and Swan's Island, the salt air, hard winters, and caring community, is our home.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

Nature and quiet. I grew up in a busy suburb 30 miles east of NYC, yet as a young person trying to find his place in the world, I needed to live closer to nature, to wild things—where my head feels uncluttered. Swan's Island, Maine, six miles off the coast and a 40 minute ferry run from the mainland, is quiet and wild. I love my life, here, my uncluttered writing life. 

What are the most important themes in your work?

The stories of nature, fatherhood, people, and the power of place.

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year.


Salty Liquor is my first full length collection of poetry. These poems tell my stories about fatherhood, being a son whose mother is aging, Swan's Island, and discovery.    

What do you hope reader will discover in your latest book?

That poetry is as accessible as Facebook. That poetry is no different than people, everyday people, start your car and go to work people, and their stories. I want readers to discover the importance of finding their place in a world that's filled to the brim with joys, adversities, and everything in between.  That finding your place is a choice. 

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

Libraries are places where discoveries are made, and I feel the future of local libraries will continue being places where we make discoveries. We discover new books, friends, ideas, movies—you name it. The Swan's Island Library, where I live, is a community center.  Our library isn't only about books. It's also where artists exhibit their work, poets perform, clubs meet, island kids learn and play, and people congregate for coffee, WiFi, and fellowship. As long as libraries look to the future openly and with a willingness to evolve to meet the changing needs of people, then local libraries will thrive, and people will thrive.

Come meet Gary Rainford -- and dozens of other authors -- at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Sunday, June 21, 2015

Cheryl Blaydon


Cheryl Blaydon's most recent book is The Heart of Stone.

What are your ties to Maine?

My paternal grandparents and great-grandparents were Mainers, mostly from the Kennebec region, but there are a few links to Wiscasset and the Boothbay peninsula as well. I had little knowledge of that side of my heritage until I moved to Maine in 1994, settling first in Edgecomb then Southport and finally, East Boothbay.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

When I first arrived in Maine, I gravitated toward painting, which is a little like telling stories through pictures. But it is here on the Boothbay peninsula that I began to draw with words. This majestic coastline continually inspires my creativity.

What are the most important themes in your work?

Family and strong relationships. My first book, The Memory Keepers, had a cast of characters set in Italy. The second, Island Odyssey, was based upon my adopted island community. I tend to gravitate toward topics that revolve around the sea—its mystery, its danger and its beauty.

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?

My latest, The Heart of Stone, is a novel that takes place in a coastal village called Oyster Cove, Maine. Spanning three generations, it is a story of strong bonds, flawed characters and found love.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?

Something of Maine that they can relate to, a treasured location or special memory.

What have you enjoyed about attending Books in Boothbay?
It is a superb chance to meet the public but also to learn about shared experiences in writing and publishing. Through the book fair, I’ve encountered writers who are not only knowledgeable but also generous with their time and information. 

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

I’m such a fan of our local libraries, I can’t say enough about the necessity to keep them alive and thriving. But I worry they might one day go the way of independent bookstores if not well supported.  

Come meet Cheryl Blaydon at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Jay Piscopo

Jay Piscopo is the author and illustrator of “The Undersea Adventures of Capt’n Eli” graphic novel series.  He has created numerous titles featuring spin off characters from this series, including “The Sea Ghost #1: The Sea Ghost in the Machine” and the “Commander X All-Star Special.”  He is known for his signature pulp style and is a frequent contributing artist for Moonstone Books.  He co-created the internationally distributed comic book series, “The Scrap City Pack Rats,” featuring the world's first disabled superheroes. This six-issue series received national attention for its groundbreaking approach and subject matter.  Jay has conducted hundreds of workshops and classroom events across the country teaching drawing and storytelling techniques.  He is an engaging presenter with extensive teaching experience.  www.captneli.com

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

I'm a Maine native. Currently living in Falmouth. I love the Boothbay region. When I was kid the Trolley Museum was a magical destination.

What is your favorite thing about writing and illustrating in Maine?

As Dorothy said, "There's no place like home." My family and friends are here and I'm proud of the community I'm a part of.

Being so close to the ocean and the rocky coastline is inspirational and relaxing after long deadlines.

I'm also inspired by Maine's place in history and researching Maine's numerous weird legends from ghosts, to mad scientists to sea monsters.

What are the most important themes in your work?

The intention behind The Undersea Adventures of Capt'n Eli has always been about creating a sense of fun and wonder in a graphic novel that could be enjoyed by kids and adults alike.  Over the years, the comics market has skewed towards an older audience, a "grim and gritty" more graphic approach to violence and the use of adult themes have significantly edged out a more "all ages" approach. Along with other independent creators working now to open comics up to a wider audience, my efforts are focused on creating books that families can read as well as fans of sci fi and high adventure that harken back to the classics with some modern twists.

Within the story, themes dealing with history, war, science, technology and multi- cultural mythology as well as themes about community and what it really means to be a hero.

Tell us about the book(s) you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?

The third installment in The Undersea Adventures of Capt'n Eli saga – The Mystery of the Devil’s Sea -- is my newest book. In the first two chapters, Capt'n Eli has been learning about himself while jumping from one adventure to the next, meeting friends like Commander X, and mysterious foes like Lord Hydro.  In this book, the time-traveling, undersea adventurer and boy inventor, Capt'n Eli, and his crew are thrown in the deep end of a global conflict with the undersea Aquarian Empire. Fast paced action, giant robots, flying submarines as well as a super hero army abound!

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?

My hope with every Capt'n Eli graphic novel is that each reader finds a rich, exotic and vast universe to become immersed in.  I hope Book 3 in the Capt’n Eli series exemplifies this with story twists, new characters and lots of eye candy.

For long-time readers, I hope they enjoy the new characters and revelations.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?


I'm seeing encouraging news every day about readers returning to real books in lieu of electronic reading devices. I'm also seeing a growing awareness of the need for libraries as an integral part of the community. I've been offering my cartoon workshop for years to libraries in many communities and I have great admiration for the dedication of librarians and the essential work they do.

Come meet Jay Piscopo at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Saturday, June 20, 2015

Wesley McNair

Wesley McNair has been called by poet Philip Levine "one of the great storytellers of contemporary poetry." Among other literary awards, he has won grants from the Fulbright and Guggenheim foundations, two Rockefeller Fellowships, and two NEA grants in creative writing. He has twice been invited to read his poetry by the Library of Congress. In 2006 he was selected for a United States Artists Fellowship as one of “America’s finest living artists.” He is the Poet Laureate of Maine and his latest book, The Lost Child, won the 2015 PEN New England Award for Poetry.

Come meet Wesley McNair at Books in Boothbay on July 11!



Diane Taylor-Moore

Diane Taylor-Moore tells us about herself:

I was born and raised in  Maine. Education started in a one-room school (with privy) in Frye and ended with a doctorate in educational leadership from Nova Southeastern. My entire career was in special education and mental health, the majority as a special education director. I have written stories since childhood when my sisters and I entertained anyone who would watch our plays. Willy Goes To Sea was my first book, followed by Here Sits A Monkey seven years later. Now, I'm writing a mystery about special education. I have been retired for several years and spend most of my time working on house projects, gardening,   reading, and writing. My husband and I live with our dog in rural Maine, close to my family.

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

I am a Maine native and from several generations of Mainers. My Taylor ancestors were among  the original settlers and incorporators of Roxbury. I've lived here all my life, and would not live full time in any other place.

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

Honestly, my favorite thing about writing is finishing the story, as I have the components kicking around in my head for months until I put them in print.

What are the most important themes in your work?

Advocating for people who have no voice; drawing moral lines, beyond which a character won't cross; revealing the possible basis, if not excuse,  for some behavior; understanding events which may seem scary or threatening so that more people intervene.

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?

I'll be signing Here Sits A Monkey which is a murder mystery set in a state hospital in Maine. I'll also have  copies of Willy Goes To Sea, my illustrated children's book about a dog who has an experience on a schooner that sails out of Rockland.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

I think that  libraries with real books will fade as the internet and virtual books take over. That's a shame. It may be a generational issue, but I can't curl up with a cup of coffee and a good kindle.

I read a  book or two a week and am astonished that after a small flurry, some books sit there for months or years without a reader. The local librarian says that most patrons are middle aged. Kids come in to use computers.

Come meet Diane Taylor-Moore and dozens of other Maine authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Friday, June 19, 2015

Ellen Cooney

Ellen Cooney’s ninth novel, The Mountaintop School For Dogs And Other Second Chances, has been recently published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Her short stories have appeared in The New Yorker and many literary journals. A fiction fellow of the Massachusetts Artists Foundation and the National Endowment For the Arts, she was a longtime writer in residence at MIT, and taught creative writing at the Harvard Extension School and Boston College. She lives in Phippsburg, Maine. Visit her website at http://ellencooney.com/ and her blog at http://ellencooney.tumblr.com/.

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

20 years ago I left my old life in Cambridge MA to homestead on the Phippsburg Peninsula--a watery world, where my road is bordered by a large pond and the Kennebec, and Popham Beach is a short drive away. It was supposed to be a getaway place where I could write and read in quiet. But it quickly became my home, as if force of gravity had pulled me here. It's hard for me to believe this now, but in my first few years of life surrounded by woods, I was sort of afraid of the dark and the silence. Now I'm so very much here, I forget what my urban self was even like.

What are the most important themes in your work?

I’ve published 9 novels and lots of short stories, and they’re all different from each other in big ways. I never think consciously of “themes” when I’m working, but I think in all my fiction it’s a big deal that people become willing to take a chance on something they never tried before—maybe it’s a belief, or a hope, or some kind of adventure, either a physical one or an emotional one. Also there’s the power of storytelling, when, if I’m doing my job right, a reader can have the adventure of reading, and it’s the kind of reading where you forget you’re reading, and you’re having your life along with the characters. “Having life” is a pretty broad category for a theme, but that’s my favorite one.

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year.

It’s a novel, The Mountaintop School For Dogs And Other Second Chances, published last years by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and newly out in paperback. It happens at a very unusual sanctuary for rescued dogs in a place that was once a ski resort.  A young woman who actually doesn’t know anything about animals goes up there and---through all sorts of trials and errors—becomes a “dog teacher.” The rescued dogs make up most of the cast of characters, but there are several other humans too, all of whom find themselves with chances to have fuller, more interesting lives. It’s an adventure story.  It’s about making connections and making a future that’s free of awful things that took place in the past. And, it’s often funny and quite dramatic.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?


A good, absorbing read! And, emotional ups and downs and some solid connecting and caring.  And, dogs, dogs, dogs, busily being who they are, while the humans around them are so involved in their rehab and in getting them ready for new lives with humans who won’t hurt them. All the animals are based on dogs I’ve known personally, and I did a great deal of research in training and rescue. What readers won’t discover is violence or graphic scenes of abuse. Rescued dogs can’t tell you what happened to them; they can show you their past hurts through different types of behavior. My book is about the healing part of the process, with all its complications, patience, effort, and triumphs large and small.

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

I belong to 2 Maine libraries and I’ve been all over doing readings for many years now, and I can say first-hand I feel happy and optimistic. Our libraries are not only surviving but thriving. I grew up in a Massachusetts mill town without a bookstore—not that my family could afford to buy books. My town’s public library was everything to me. I’ve never stopped feeling grateful and I know I never will. My favorite verb for libraries? Love.

Meet Ellen Cooney and a room full of other authors at Books in Boothbay on July 11!

Jacqueline Tourville

Jacqueline Tourville is the author of the picture book Albie’s First Word: A Tale Inspired by Albert Einstein’s Childhood, as well as several books for adults.

What are your ties to Maine or the Boothbay Peninsula?

I moved with my family to Wells, Maine in 2011. We are originally from New York. As a child, everything I knew about Maine came from watching Murder, She Wrote. The first time we visited Boothbay, I thought I had stumbled into Cabot Cove! The two bear a striking resemblance, although I’ve learned that Murder, She Wrote was actually filmed in California. Still, every time I’m here, I keep an eye out for Jessica Fletcher — just in case!

What is your favorite thing about writing in Maine?

Writing can be a lonely endeavor in many ways, which is why being able to take part in the rich and varied writing community of Maine feels likes a gift. I know that at least a dozen writers for children live within a 20-mile radius of my home. It’s incredible to have others so nearby to talk shop.

What are the most important themes in your work?

I am drawn to telling stories about people who have made lasting contributions to our society because they were willing to be true to themselves.

Tell us about the book you will be signing at Books In Boothbay this year?

I will be signing ALBIE’S FIRST WORD: A Tale Inspired by Albert Einstein’s Childhood. Albie is a finalist for a 2015 Maine Literary Award for children's literature.

What do you hope readers will discover in your latest book?

Sometimes the extraordinary needs a little patience and love to come to the surface. The story of Albert Einstein’s childhood is a wonderful example of this.

If you have attended Books In Boothbay in the past, please tell us what you enjoyed about it?

I attended Books in Boothbay last year as a book fan (Albie had not come out yet). I had such a good time and found so many great books to read! It is an honor for me to be returning this year as an author.  

What do you feel about the future of our local libraries?

I am amazed at how responsive Maine’s local libraries are to the changing needs of children and families. Some libraries I’ve visited have evening story hours for children, so working parents can attend. Other libraries provide programming that ties in with kids’ unique interests, like the Manga club that meets at the Kennebunk public library. I love seeing this kind of forward thinking!

Come meet Jacqueline Tourville and dozens of additional writers and artists at Books in Boothbay on July 11!